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Get to Know Texas Oncology–Plano Prestonwood’s Dr. Wendy Mahone-Johnson

August 02, 2019

We recently welcomed Wendy Mahone-Johnson, M.D., to the Texas Oncology–Plano Prestonwood team. We sat down with Dr. Mahone-Johnson to learn more about her career as an oncologist and her passion for patient care.

What excites you about joining an organization like Texas Oncology?

There is an intentional effort to educate patients and engage them as active participants in the healthcare decision-making process, and patients are provided with resources to accomplish that goal.

What are you most looking forward to as cancer treatment continues to evolve and why? 

I am looking forward to better tolerated therapies that allow patients to have extended survival, fewer side effects, and better quality of life. With the development of less toxic therapies, people can live better with a cancer diagnosis. I am elated when my patients share photos of themselves, and they are living with cancer as more of a chronic illness. I have a box of keepsakes to remind me of them.

What has working with cancer patients taught you about resiliency of the human spirit?

The greatest lesson I have learned about resiliency of the human spirit is that we can positively influence it. It’s not just one’s inherent ability to handle a difficult situation. As a physician, my words can nurture, so I try to be as thoughtful about what I say as I am about the treatment plan. Every encounter is an opportunity to positively influence others.

It’s a gift to bring calm to a stressful situation, to provide answers where patients have questions, and to encourage and provide hope when patients have doubt.”

What is the No. 1 thing you want your patients to know about you? 

I consider it a privilege to do my job. It’s a gift to bring calm to a stressful situation, to provide answers where patients have questions, and to encourage and provide hope when patients have doubt. 

Do you have a favorite quote that inspires you?

If you don’t like something, change it. If you can’t change it, change your attitude. 

What advice would you give someone who is aspiring to be a doctor? 

The best advice I ever received was early in my medical career, but it has served me well on many occasions. I don’t believe it’s by chance that it also aligns with Texas Oncology’s promise to patients – my advice for an aspiring doctor is do the right thing, all the time. 


For upcoming webinars visit www.TexasOncologyFoundation.org