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Texas Oncology-Carrollton Radiation Oncology
4352 N. Josey Lane
Carrollton, TX 75010
T: 972-695-2595
After HoursT: 972-394-4368
Hours of Operation:




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Texas Oncology-Carrollton Radiation Oncology

Texas Oncology-Carrolton Radiation Oncology is how Texans fight cancer. We’re proud to call Carrollton home, and we understand what it means to be part of this community.

We also understand the importance of being close to your support network when you’re fighting cancer. We're part of Texas Oncology-Carrolton, a comprehensive cancer center staffed with knowledgeable and supportive teams to tend to chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and other vital services. Diagnostic imaging, laboratory services, and a pharmacy are close-at-hand to make the process more manageable.

Radiation Modalities

Texas Oncology-Carrollton Radiation Oncology offers a robust array of radiation modalities:

Imaging Equipment

  • >Computed Tomography (CT)
    Computed tomography (CT) is a quick and painless procedure that combines X-rays with computers to produce highly detailed cross-sectional pictures of your body. The images provide valuable information for staging your cancer or planning your treatments. Learn More.
    • >CT simulation

      After the initial consultation and decision to use radiation treatment, the next session is usually a planning session, which is called a simulation. Simulation is used to determine the radiation treatment fields and most of the treatment planning. Of all the visits to the radiation oncology facility, the simulation session may actually take the most time.

      The CT simulator does not deliver radiation treatment, but instead allows the radiation oncologist and technologists to see the area to be treated. Images are obtained and transferred to the planning system where a virtual 3D image of the patient is created, and the treatment delivery plan is developed.

      For the simulation session, temporary marks are made on your skin with markers to identify the treatment areas. The room is periodically darkened while the treatment fields are being set. Alignment is critical during simulation and is facilitated by lasers mounted on the wall and ceiling. Special individually constructed immobilization devices may be used to help achieve this alignment. While you may see red lines of light, the low energy lasers are for alignment purposes only and you will not feel burning or anything else from the laser light.

      Once the aspects of the treatment fields are set, the technologist will take special simulation X-rays representing the treatment fields. In most centers, the patient is given multiple “tattoos,” which mark the treatment fields and replace the marks previously made with magic markers. These tattoos are not elaborate and consist of no more than pinpricks followed by ink, appearing like a small freckle. Tattoos enable the radiation technologists to set up the treatment fields each day with precision, while allowing you to wash and bathe without worrying about obscuring the marks that indicate where treatment will be delivered.

      Sometimes several simulation sessions are necessary in order to optimize treatment and are often performed prior to planned “boost” or “reduced field” treatments as part of the overall treatment plan. Learn More.
    • >Diagnostic CT imaging
      A CT scan can help doctors diagnose cancer and identify a tumor’s shape, size, and location. Learn More.

CT Simulation Techniques

  • >4D CT scanning
    Four-dimensional computed tomography is a type of CT scanning which records multiple images over time. Images are mapped to the breathing cycle to give care teams more information about respiration and internal movement for treatment planning. Planning 4D-CT scans can be used to minimize target volumes for lung cancer radiotherapy. Learn More.

External Radiation Therapy

  • >Conventional 2D, 3D, electron treatments
    • Conventional 2D – Conventional (2D) radiation therapy refers to the technique of radiation therapy where treatments are planned by defining a limited number of beams with the boundaries delineated on patient X-rays. Conventional 2D radiation therapy is typically used for palliative treatment.
    • 3D Conformal Radiation – A type of external beam radiation therapy, 3D conformal radiation therapy combines images from CT, MRI, and PET scans to plan the radiation treatment. Software analyzes the images and helps direct radiation beams to conform to the tumor’s shape.
    • Electron Treatments – Electron therapy uses electrons directed to the outer layers of the skin to cover the surface of the body. It does not go into deeper tissues or organs.  
    Learn More.
  • >Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)
    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is an advanced form of non-invasive radiation treatment enabling radiation oncologists to precisely target tumor cells. It uses computed tomography (CT) to create 3D images and treatment plans to deliver targeted radiation beams of varying intensity to cancerous tumors. By using image-guidance technologies, your radiation oncologist can localize your treatment and minimize damage to surrounding tissue. Learn More.

Image-Guided Radiation Therapy

  • >Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID)
    Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) measure X-ray intensity transmitted through a patient during treatment. This measurement is transformed into a 2D digital image to accurately align the radiation beam to the tumor. Learn More.
  • >Onboard Imaging - Conebeam CT, Kilovotage imaging, Fluoroscopy
    Onboard imaging allows care teams to better align treatment to a tumor that may have a complex shape or move, which damage to healthy tissues.
    • Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) – Physicians use Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT), which utilizes 3D volumetric imaging (vs. 2D X-ray images), to provide improved visualization, better patient positioning, and more precise treatment of cancerous tumors.
    • Kilovoltage Cone Beam Computed Tomography (kV-CBCT) – A type of board imaging, kilovoltage Cone Beam CT allows care teams to make adjustments to the X-rays that impact the intensity and quality of the image.
    • Fluoroscopy – Fluoroscopy is another medical imaging test that can be used in IGRT. An image of the area is created by sending an X-ray beam continuously through the body to create an image. Physicians can view the image on a monitor in real time to see the movement of internal organs.
    Learn More.

Respiratory Gating

  • > Varian RGSC or RPM
    Varian respiratory gating for scanners (RGSC) or real-time position management (RPM) gives care teams the ability to accurately allow for tumor motion and patient breathing in treatment planning.

Radiation Information Systems

  • > Elekta Mosiq
    Elekta MOSAIQ® Care Management software helps manage all aspects of a radiation oncology program, keeping patient information easily accessible while simplifying complex treatment management, personalizing decision support, and reducing errors and wait times.

Medical Records

Medical Records Coordinator
4352 N. Josey Lane
Carrollton, TX 75010
T: 972-394-4368
F: 972-394-4941

Learn more about medical records