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Smoking Bans

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While smokers face a higher risk of developing lung cancer, nonsmokers are at risk as well, especially if exposed to secondhand smoke. Exposure to secondhand smoke claims the lives of nearly 50,000 nonsmoking adults each year, most notably from lung cancer and heart disease. Due to the severe health consequences related to secondhand smoke, smoking bans have become increasingly important. According to Smoke-Free Texas, 29 states are “smoke-free states,” meaning they do not allow smoking in bars, restaurants, and workplaces. Texas does not currently have a statewide smoking ban, but many cities throughout the state have smoking bans in place.

Statistics 

  • An estimated 3,400 people in the U.S. will die from lung cancer caused by exposure to secondhand smoke each year.
  • Exposure to secondhand smoke increases the risk of being diagnosed with lung cancer by 20–30 percent.
  • Cities with active smoking bans cover nearly 8.5 million Texans, or about 45 percent of all Texas residents.
  • There are currently 36 Texas cities with a “comprehensive” smoking ban, meaning that the city is entirely smoke-free in workplaces, restaurants, and bars.

States with Comprehensive Smoking Bans 

  • Arizona
  • California
  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • Delaware
  • Hawaii
  • Illinois
  • Kansas
  • Iowa
  • Maine
 
  • Maryland
  • Massachusetts
  • Michigan
  • Minnesota
  • Montana
  • Nebraska
  • New Hampshire
  • New Jersey
  • New Mexico
  • New York
 
  • North Carolina
  • Ohio
  • Oregon
  • Rhode Island
  • South Dakota
  • Utah
  • Vermont
  • Washington
  • Wisconsin
 

Comprehensive Smoking Bans in Texas 

  • Abilene
  • Alton
  • Austin
  • Baytown
  • Beaumont
  • Benbrook
  • College Station
  • Copperas Cove
  • Corpus Christi
  • Dallas
  • Eagle Pass
  • El Paso
 
  • Ennis
  • Flower Mound
  • Granbury
  • Horseshoe Bay
  • Houston
  • Laredo
  • Marshall
  • McKinney
  • Missouri City
  • Nacogdoches
  • Pearland
  • Plano
 
  • Portland
  • Robinson
  • Rosenberg
  • San Angelo
  • San Antonio
  • Socorro
  • Southlake
  • Tyler
  • University Park
  • Vernon
  • Victoria
  • Woodway
 

Sources: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Smoke-Free Texas